The Missing Tattoo of the Assassin

24843_a

Detail of the Mummified Skin of Vlado Chernozemski, from J. Herber’s Tatouage et Politique, 1944

 

Some mysterious books only propagate more mysteries. J. Herber’s Tatouage et Politique is a slim and obscure pamphlet, published in Caluire in 1944 – one of a number of pamphlets on the history of tattooing which the doctor published in his lifetime. As well as the title text, it also includes two other short texts, Épigraphie du tatouage – which focused on epigraphy tattoos – and Le tatouage dans l’oeuvre d’Anatole France, an early analysis of tattoos in a literary work. The pamphlet was published as part of the Albums du Crocodile series, under the direction of L’Association Génerale de L’Internat des Hospices Civils de Lyon, of which Herber’s fellow historian of tattooing, J. Lacassagne, was associated with.

The title piece is a brief, but important attempt to understand the political elements of tattooing, of which there had been at that point (and even since then) little focused scholarly work upon. The pamphlet would have a place in the history of tattoo scholarship on the merits of that article alone, but it is perhaps more notable for including a reproduction of what appears to be a portion of the preserved skin of Vlado Chernozemski, aka Vlado the Chauffeur, the famous assassin who shot and killed Alexander of Yugoslavia – one of the first assassinations to be filmed, which has etched the act into the filmic memory of the 20th century.

This tattoo, a skull and crossbones with the initials V.M.R.O. – the Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization – was originally the only clue French police had to determine his identity, which they were unable to do at the time of burial. However, this photograph of a patch of Vlado’s skin seems to suggest that he was not buried with his tattoo.

This is the only reproduction we’ve ever seen of the tattoo, though a tantalizing note states that it resides at the time of publication in the collection of Dr. Beroud, at the Musée de Criminalistique de Marseille – an institution which doesn’t seem to survive, at least under that name. A research project for some intrepid visitor to Marseille willing to make some inquiries and find the whereabouts of this missing tattoo. . .

24843

Tatouage et Politique by J. Herber

Herber, J. Tatouage et Politique. Caluire, Strasbourg, Rhône: M. Tournus fils, 1944. First edition. 8vo, 24 pp, saddle-stapled wraps printed in two colors. Illustrated with two full page reproductions and several small drawings in the text. Text in French.

Toning to margins of wraps and pages and some light handling creases, but a well-preserved, near fine example. An obscure imprint for the trade which likely had very limited distribution; OCLC locates only three holdings, all within France.  [24843] Inquire. 

 

24843_b

Detail of the Mummified Skin of Vlado Chernozemski, from J. Herber’s Tatouage et Politique, 1944

The Book is the Weapon Part II

24595

 

Five years ago I wrote an essay about one of my favorite books, Uwe Wandrey’s Kampfreime,  which in 1968 was designed and published as a weapon for self-defense following the death of Benne Ohnesorg in the ’68 protests. In the years since I’ve not been able to find any more references to books designed as weapons, until a few months ago I opened a package from Berlin and to discover a second book that is a weapon – this one also German.

50 Gramm zensierter Most in der Tüte appears to be an artists’ book by Künstlergruppe AV`88, consisting of a shredded xerox copy of Johan Most’s Revolutionäre Kriegswissenschaften” (1875) – the famed German anarchists rare instruction manual for the manufacture of bombs. According to the printed title sheet, the shredded book has been censured in advance by the group, which also notes that smoking the material within could be dangerous for health of the state. Presumably, the strips are to be used as tinder, metaphorically or physically.

Most’s work has become largely obscured these days, and I admire the inventive way that it references a work published more than 100 years earlier. I don’t know much about other works by the group, if there are any, and welcome any information.

Neither OCLC nor KVK locate any holdings.

Künstlergruppe AV’88. 50 Gramm zensierter Most in der Tüte. Ein Projekt der Künstlergruppe AV`88. [Frankfurt]: Verlag Edition AV 88, [1988]. Sealed plastic bag filled with xeroxed and shredded strips from Johann Most’s book “Revolutionäre Kriegswissenschaften”, with printed red title sheet sealed within.

24595_a

What Would Happen If I Were to Stand Up?

24549

 

I first encountered the art of James Francis Horrabin in his illustrations for his friend H. G. Well’s The Outline of History, the work for which he is best known. Luckily, that led me to Horrabin’s own work, such as the fascinating The Plebs Atlas (1926) – which along with his other works on mapping, represent one of the most sustained pre-WWII efforts at a radical, socialist cartography.

Before yesterday’s mail, however, I’d never seen his striking cover illustration for the Plebs League pamphlet Do Your Own Thinking, which shows that Horrabin also had an eye for mapping more abstract social spaces as well. A muscular worker – The Man Underneath – kneels on one knee beneath a table on which dance a line of pudgy men and women in evening wear. Our worker casts a grave and thoughtful eye towards the reader, and states, rather than asks, “I’m just thinking what would happen if I were to stand up!”

 

24549_a

 

[Horrabin, J. F.]. Do Your Own Thinking. London: Plebs League, nd [c. 1920’s]. First edition. Small 8vo, 14 pp, saddle-stapled illustrated wraps. Inquire.

24549_b